Readers Comments

I thought it would be good to dedicate a page for readers of this blog to leave their experiences and advice or to ask any questions.


34 comments:

  1. It looks like you are in for a fun time James, well done

    You have done the right thing engaging the MGE BBS as all of us there are eInDtIhOuTsSiasts and will willingly engage with you. Some of us are really good, some of us try the patience of saints or sinners

    All of us love the Spridgets we have lavished so much effort and energy on

    And I wish I'd had this much car to start with at the beginning

    Best of luck and good wishes


    bill sgpm

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  2. been there; done that

    don't give up even when you're convinced that the only sensible course of action is to torch the whole lot.

    and yes: there is the wisdom of Solomon on the BBS

    albeit distributed amongst many brains!

    keep posting!

    Dave

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  3. A great site for a worthwhile project!

    I've owned my 1964 Mark 2 Midget for over 30 years and have just started its second restoration, aiming to have it ready for the 2013 Fougeres Rally http://www.rallye-fougeres.org

    Good luck with your restoration!

    Steve

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  4. Have a look at my website for interest,
    www.mgmidget.moonfruit.com
    I Am just starting out!
    Ian

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  5. Well finally got round to reading your blog Mr Paul, and while it looks daughting it also looks a lot of fun! I'll be keeping an eye to see how she progresses. BTW I have a polishing kit if you want to use it.

    Enjoy !
    Regards,
    Glenn M.

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  6. You're not mad... or we both are. I'm restoring my own 1965 Midget that has the same "issues" with complete and utter lack of non-rusted sheetmetal that you appear to be facing. I've gotten as far as fitting the driver's side floorpan, rebuilding the footwell, replacing the sill, and replacing the battery tray.

    If I may offer advice... a good MIG welder with gas, and lots and lots of practice using it, is essential. Test fit and test fit and test fit before you weld. take lots of pictures before you make changes. It looks like you're off on the right foot and having one heck of an adventure!

    I'm shutting down for the summer... too hot here to work. :) Keep us all posted!

    MWAHAHAHA

    Steve Strublic
    Phoenix, AZ

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  7. I read through your whole blog in one sitting as I am going today to look at a 1963 MG Midget I am considering for restoration. My wife was giving me the "Have you lost your mind?" look. I will definitely keep following your progress.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Rob,
      Thank you for taking the (what must have been a considerable amount of) time to read my blog! I hope it has given you some inspiration. Without this blog I might have given up by now, just because you can so easily lose focus. I know that this will be a long project that I can dip in and out from. But if you are planning to restore an MG for the experience then I would go for it. If you want to restore one because you'd like to drive a finished one around, then just buy a good one! From my experience get the best one that you can for your budget.
      Good luck
      James

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  8. Great to see other people love to work on Midget's.
    I will start restoring my 72 Midget in september.
    I wonder what problems i am heading for, but i know most will be good fun.
    At least it is much more fun than watching the tele.
    Thank you for the blog, it gave me many good idea's for the future.
    Jos
    Weert, The Netherlands

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  9. Hi Jos,
    Glad you enjoy reading my blog. Good luck with your restoration! I hope it goes smoother than mine!!
    Kind regards
    James

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  10. Hi, as i told you before I would start my own project in September.
    I could not wait and started in August. I did see your project is a bit more work than mine. But you will never know what misery I will discover the coming weeks and months.
    You inspired me to start my own blog so you are invited to make a visit there.
    Good luck with your restauration, I will keep following your blog.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Jos,
      Good to here from you. Feel free to ask any questions if you need help.
      If you post your blog here I can add it to the others!
      Take care
      James

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    2. no worries, I found it! http://midgetproject.blogspot.co.uk/

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  11. Hi. Have you had any issues with the shell twisting/sagging given the amount of structure you have had to remove?

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  12. Hi Damo,

    Thank you for reading my blog.

    To be to the point the simplest answer is yes, as it is only to be expected.

    The longer version is that the chassis was out of shape before I had started to remove rusted panels and a previous owner had badly tried to repair the rust problems which resulted in the doors not fitting.

    The only way to get the car square again was to remove the patch work and rusted panels and start again. I am fairly sure that working from the rear suspension mounts forwards and working round the doors will produce the required end result.

    Guess you'll have to keep reading to find out if I'm right!

    Kind regards
    James

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  13. James, I find myself at a critical point in my restoration, photo 20 on your gallery 2 is where I'm at. Have you any useful advice about important alignments etc before I start welding? Regards Damo.

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  14. Hi Damo,

    Thank you for following my blog and posting your question.

    I am actually at the same point right now. That photo was taken many months ago when I was just looking to see how the panels lined up. Since then I have done major work on the rear bulk head and now the footwell end panel.

    Each example will be different, for example have you have to replace the crossmember, if not then this will give you a good starting point for the inner sill.

    If the rear bulk head is still intact then the inner sill should sit comfortably on that and fit over the jacking point on the crossmember and line up with the footwell end panel.

    The footwell side panel has a lip to where the inner sill will sit which has a curve on it that needs to finish flush. Also the side panel needs to fit tight against the wheel arch.

    The best advice is to have the door in place before you do any welding as that is effectively what you are building the car around. Try a few small welds to see how it is all fitting together.

    Good luck and please feel free to ask any further questions.

    Kind regards

    James


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  15. James, have you done any more work recently?
    Damian.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Damo,

      Sorry for the delay. I am in the process of buying a new house which has it's own double garage! As soon as I have moved, work will begin again!!

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  16. Hello James; I have just found your Blog and I must congratulate you on a fine job you have been making of your restoration. I've just started on a similar restoration of a Frogeye here in Canada and I can appreciate the hard work that has gone into your project. I was wondering however how you have managed with no visible bracing of the body. Most restorations I have seen have had some bracing support to stop sagging or twisting while chunks of the body have been removed. Have you had any problems in this area? Cheers, .....Gareth

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  17. Hi Gareth,

    Thank you for reading my blog!

    The main reasoning for not supporting the chassis was because when I bought the Midget the doors didn't fit properly as a prior owner had tried to repair the chassis and had not done a proper job! The car had also taken a slight hit on the back wing. So I made the decision to rebuild the car around the doors and I am getting close to that point where measurements are very, very important!!

    If you are restoring a Frogeye and most of it looks to line up properly then I would definitely advise welding some steal tubing to support the chassis.

    Good luck with your project.

    Kind regards
    James

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  18. Thanks for your response James. Yes, I have added some tubing and angle iron to hopefully brace the body. Your photos have been helpful in figuring out how things go together. I'm about to remove the drivers sill so hopefully things will remain rigid. Cheers, ...Gareth

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  19. Hi James,

    I am also restoring a 1965 Midget. I've been working on mine on and off since 2008 and got serious the past couple of years. I found your blog and I am amazed at how similar our efforts have been. I'm not sure if my car was better or worse than yours was when you started, but it was pretty far gone in much the same ways as yours.

    I like the idea of the blog, so I have started my own at midget.strublic.net. I hope you appreciate that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, because I like the look of yours...

    There were a few years where I thought I'd never get around to it or that I'd never get this far, but I haven't given up. I hope you finish yours soon now that you're settled in.

    Best,

    Steve

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    Replies
    1. Hi Steve, thank you for reading my blog! I think it is fantastic to see so many people who don't want to forget what was so great about these classic cars and the more that can be restored for future generations the better. What better why than to share it on the internet as that is where my boys seem to send most of their spare time.
      I have read your blog tonight and they are very similar in terms of their condition...rusty! You seem to have done really well though and I am sure I'll learn some useful tips from your experience.
      All the best
      James

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  20. Hi James,

    About 17 years ago I bought a 1965 MG Midget (dark BRG, originally tartan red). Some years almost nothing happened (due all kinds of reasons and sometimes excuses...). Some years I was quite productive....It will probably become known als TLRPIH (The Longest Resto Project In History :-) LOL

    Now the kids have grown up, I'm dedicated to complete my project within 3-5 years ;-)

    The LH repairs are almost completed (repaired and replaced). So, now I'm working on the RH side. A-post repair ongoing (sill repair completed), RH floorplan scheduled for Oct-Jan.

    Keep on going!

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  21. Haven't seen anything new from you in a while... hope all is well!

    Steve

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  22. Hey James, i’m a little stuck on my rear wheel arch, where the inner arch meets the heel kick board there’s some kind of recess - a no mans land, if I set you some pictures; could you sh d some light on it for me?

    Thanks! Keep up the good work!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Alex, Yes of course, I'll try my best to help you. You could have a look at these posts as well, but send me some of the photos: jamespaul23@hotmail.co.uk
      https://1965mgmidgetrestoration.blogspot.co.uk/2014/02/wheel-arch-repairs-continued.html

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  23. Hello James,

    Your restoration project and blog are an inspiration to me. Keep pushing through. I know how much of an emotional roller coaster this process can be. From the proud moments of smithing a complicated patch panel, producing some really nice textbook welds, to the times when you think you’ve finished something only to find that you should have measured twice or considered that other dimension, or the horror of seeing your rust converter paint seep through a seam weld. Ouch! And that other emotion - loneliness. My wife is very patient.

    And to help ‘balluhknaller’ feel better, I too have had my project car on ice due to a slew of really good reasons and excuses,. With my kids out of nest now, I’ve finally managed to get my first year in on restoring my 1967 Sprite. It’s been 33 years (not 17). Embarrassing.

    So keep at it! You have a lot to show thus far - you’ll pull through. I can’t wait to see your results.

    I’ve reached a point where I’m kind of stuck and am just mentally fatigued. Time to step away and recharge. So I’m taking a moment to address some honey-do projects, do a bit of mind-melding with fellow restorers, research, order parts, and maybe start my own blog. (also a good time to magnet sweep the garage, account for my tools, and wash my shop clothes)

    Thanks for all the photos and info.

    Steve Schmidt

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  24. Congratulations! Really great job and so helpful to see all of the detailed photo's. Thank you for sharing. Reminds me of restoring my MG and inspires me to do another.

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  25. Many thanks for your kind comments. I'm glad you enjoyed reading the blog. Not sure I'll do another!

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  26. Hello,

    I am rebuilding my other half's 1974 RWA at the moment, your blog is proving very useful as I am having many of the same bodywork issues that you had. A great source for inspiration and knowledge. Keep it up!! Simon

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  27. Hi Simon, Thanks for your message. Good luck with your project. If you need any help just let me know. James

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